Making own meals does not necessarily mean better diet quality

In a study of 2,800 Australians between the ages of 26 and 36, researchers found little evidence that those who typically helped prepare the main meal on a workday had more healthful diets than those who left the cooking to someone else in the household.

Women who cooked for themselves tended to get more vegetables in their overall diet than women who did not — but the difference was just less than one extra serving.

Similarly, men who prepared their own meals tended to eat more lean meat and meat “alternatives” than their less health-minded counterparts. However, again, the average difference was minor.

The findings were reported in the Journal of American Dietetic Association.

SOURCE:
Reuters: http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE68E5UC20100915?feedType=nl&feedName=ushealth1100

Journal of the American Dietetic Association, September 2010:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B758G50VXBH3M&_user=4420034&_coverDate=09%2F30%2F2010&_rdoc=1&_fmt=high&_orig=search&_origin=search&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_acct=C000063005&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=4420034&md5=c0b34930f6524ebadce22f2fee63404e&searchtype=a

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